The “Unsellable Homes” season finale provides hope that the U.S. housing market is finally starting to change

The “Unsellable Homes” season finale provides hope that the U.S. housing market is finally starting to change

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Throughout this season of HGTV’s “Unsellable Houses,” Leslie Davis And Lindsey Lamb They faced challenges from what they described as an “unpredictable” housing market. However, the twin sisters finally got a surprising positive result for the renovation they completed in the Season 4 finale, landing an offer that far exceeded their asking price!

In the episode “Impossible Expectations”, Davis and Lamb are paired up Jimmy And Amya brother and sister who recently inherited a four-bedroom, three-bathroom home in Woodinville, Washington, from their father.

The siblings explain that their father died before he could complete the renovations he had long hoped for, and express a desire to see those plans before selling the place. The 1970s-style home is valued at approximately $680,000.

Davis admits she is moved by their affection, but remains grounded in reality and only wants to invest in areas that are most deserving of returns.

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“We want to honor their father, and I know they want to honor their father, but we can’t lose money to honor their father,” she explains.

The sisters paid $130,000 and set to work on some high-return-on-investment changes that would eventually attract the overbidding buyer. Read on to find out what upgrades sellers should make to their homes to bring in more money.

Restore the dilapidated exterior appearance

Jimmy and Amy's father's house is in desperate need of an exterior makeover.
Jimmy and Amy’s father’s house is in desperate need of an exterior makeover.

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The home is located in one of Woodinville’s most sought-after neighborhoods, but its exterior leaves a lot to be desired, with peeling paint and warped panels creating an eyesore.

The twins allocate nearly a third of their budget — $42,000 — to painting and rebuilding the roof, garage doors, gutters, stairs and siding.

Davis and Lamb are spending a lot of money to improve the curb appeal of this home
Leslie Davis and Lindsay Lamb are spending a lot of money to improve the appeal of this home in Unsellable Homes.

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Even though it’s “one of the biggest transformations” they’ve ever done, the investment in the home’s curb appeal pays off when they have a successful open house

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“There’s a lot of money going outside, but no one would have walked through those front doors if that outside had stayed the same,” Lamb says.

Save money by working around existing systems

The current layout of this 1970s-style home is too narrow and choppy for modern tastes.
The current layout of this 1970s-style home is too narrow and choppy for modern tastes.

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Inside, Davis and Lamb are considering their options for overhauling the cramped quarters in two important areas: the kitchen and the master suite.

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When they discovered that moving the electrical and plumbing systems up one wall could cost just $30,000, they decided to focus on what they could do cosmetically in order to reduce construction costs.

“If we started moving walls, plumbing and electrical, we could lose a huge budget,” Lamb explains.

Expanding one entrance without demolishing the wall solves the space problem and saves money.
Expanding one entrance without demolishing the wall solves the space problem and saves money.

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They widen the doorway instead of opening up the wall, then replace the old appliances with modern appliances, keeping them in their original location. These choices allow the sisters to tackle difficult planning issues while also staying within budget.

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Design keeping in mind the local demographic

The current kitchen finishes are too dated for buyers looking in this upscale neighborhood.
The current kitchen finishes are too dated for buyers looking in this upscale neighborhood.

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The cosmetic changes in the kitchen are also an example of how Davis and Lamb chose the design based on what buyers in that specific neighborhood wanted in an upscale home.

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More broker:

“Buyers expect a lot at this price point,” Davis points out. The sisters choose a polished leather finish on the quartz countertop, patterned floor, and tile backsplash.

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A quartz countertop and luxurious tile backsplash instantly elevate this kitchen.
A quartz countertop and luxurious tile backsplash instantly elevate this kitchen.

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A little mid-century modern goes a long way

Davis and Lamb decided early on to embrace the home's mid-century modern sensibilities.
Davis and Lamb decided early on to embrace the home’s mid-century modern aesthetic.

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Davis and Lamb also take the style of the home into account when it comes to organization and decor.

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The sisters agree on an aesthetic they call “mid-century modern with a twist.”

“But we don’t want to delve into that because we’re in a fairly traditional area,” warns Lamb.

The green and orange accent pieces play up the home's mid-century modern aesthetic without overpowering the design.
The green and orange accent pieces play up the home’s mid-century modern aesthetic without overpowering the design.

HGTV

Their strategy is on display in the living room, where architectural features such as the fireplace are highlighted, with era-specific decor playing a supporting role.

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“The pops of color in our living art pieces as well as the little splashes of orange and green throughout the house definitely add to that mid-century modernism, but we wouldn’t go overboard,” Lamb says.

Pop in some plants

A rooftop privacy screen doubles as a plant shelf.
A rooftop privacy screen doubles as a plant shelf.

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From those living art pieces made of moss to the potted plants Davis and Lamb chose for the space, greenery plays a big role in this home’s final phase.

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Plants are used strategically both indoors and outdoors on the deck’s custom privacy screen, which can be used as a plant shelf.

The sisters explained that organized homes sell 90% faster than disorganized homes, so it’s a no-brainer to place some plants around a space that’s for sale.

How does this house become unsaleable?

The twins’ healthy renovation budget of $130,000 is paying off nicely. Davis and Lamb confidently listed the home for $999,750, but were overwhelmed by the response.

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“Finally, the purchase price was amazing,” Davis says.

Davis and Lamb are thrilled with the offer, which exceeds the asking price.
Davis and Lamb are thrilled with the offer, which exceeds the asking price.

HGTV

With an offer of $1,175,000, the sisters can get the money back, plus make a profit of $365,000 to split with Jamie and Amy. This comes out to $182,500 per pair.

For both sets of siblings, the sale of this previously unsellable home signals the beginning of a new chapter.

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“There’s a little bit of light on our market again,” Lamb says.

(tags for translation)HGTV

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