Espace Perepunka | Signature of Perepunka

Espace Perepunka |  Signature of Perepunka

The new public building in Peribunka, built on the edge of Lake Saint-Jean, combines the past and future of this village of 500 inhabitants. Created in Montreal, the original twisted sunshades are gems of architecture and fabric.



The name Pierrebonca embodies two important elements of Quebec’s popular culture: its countryside is the setting of a Louis Hemon novel Maria ChapdelaineIts pier has served as the starting point for the international crossing of Lake Saint-Jean since its beginnings in 1955.

This community is proud of this heritage, and has joined forces in recent years to obtain a building with unique architecture and true to its identity. “It wanted a visual signature that would bridge the gap between its origins and its vision for the future,” summarizes Alexandre Simard, principal architect at MDO Maîtres d’Œuvre Architectes de Chicoutimi.

How did this small municipality manage to afford a $17 million building? By integrating all its needs into one project: a new municipal building, fire station, municipal library, multi-purpose rooms for its community organizations and incorporating the village church, which was converted into the Louis-Haimon Museum.

That’s not all. The architectural ensemble, built on the site of a former school abandoned for many years, includes a listed heritage house, considered a symbol of the first colonial institutions in the area.

Hajj site


Photo by Stefan Grollo, courtesy of MDO

The result is sober and luxurious.

The result ? A sober and luxurious building at the same time, in the form of a fence of wood, stone and glass, and at its heart lies the ancestral home. This choice represents a small revolution in itself. “We had to be convincing,” admits Carl Hovington, architect and project manager at MDO.

The house, which was inhabited by Haemon at the time of writing his work, has long been considered a popular place of pilgrimage, despite its relative distance from the village. The initial plan included moving it to a place very close to the museum, where its rural environment will be redeveloped in a way that respects its historical context, in accordance with the standards of the Ministry of Culture.

  • In the back we see the small house that has become a place of pilgrimage.

    Photo by Stefan Grollo, courtesy of MDO

    In the back we see the small house that has become a place of pilgrimage.

  • An aerial view of Espace Péribonka and its balconies

    Photo by Stefan Grollo, courtesy of MDO

    An aerial view of Espace Péribonka and its balconies

  • Outdoor spaces allow you to enjoy the view and the great outdoors.

    Photo by Stefan Grollo, courtesy of MDO

    Outdoor spaces allow you to enjoy the view and the great outdoors.

  • A glass corridor connects the old church to the new building.

    Photo by Stefan Grollo, courtesy of MDO

    A glass corridor connects the old church to the new building.

  • View of Louis Hemon's former home

    Photo by Stefan Grollo, courtesy of MDO

    View of Louis Hemon’s former home

1/5

“Even in the field, the house would have been taken out of context, because it would have been moved close to the regional road. It would have been damaged by car pollution, as well as bad weather caused by its proximity to Lake Saint-Jean. In addition “The traffic noise would not have helped the visitor immerse himself in his world,” asserts Mr. Huffington.

“So we convinced the Ministry of Culture to place it at the heart of the project, as the main museum piece, and to place the other parts of the project around it as a protective frame. “This way it becomes the jewel of the museum,” explains Alexandre Simard.

Innovative sun masks


Photo by Stefan Grollo, courtesy of MDO

The different parts of the project are placed around the old house.

Designing an inspiring library was also a key element of this literature-related community. The library was formerly housed in the old presbytery, and now occupies a large part of the building. The cathedral ceiling creates a balance with the adjacent ancient church.

“The goal of the library is to become a gathering place like the church once was,” Mr. Simard says.


Photo by Stefan Grollo, courtesy of MDO

The library is intended to be a gathering place.

Its large reading spaces are flooded with natural light thanks to its entirely glazed southern façade. This huge window also allows visitors to enjoy the magnificent view of the Peripunka River flowing towards Lake Saint-Jean.

“Full sunlight still has drawbacks,” admits Alexandre Simard. The heat can become uncomfortable in the summer and the sun causes the books to deteriorate. We needed to mitigate these two elements. »

the solution ? A series of long vertical umbrellas with a twisted shape. Created by Montreal-based textile engineering company Sollertia, these long strips of polyester and PVC allow you to enjoy an exceptional view of the landscape while blocking out the sun’s rays.


Photo by Stefan Grollo, courtesy of MDO

Sun masks developed by the Montreal company Solertea

This project required a lot of research and development to create the unusual forms sought by the architects, admits Claude Le Bell, president and founder of Solertia.


Photo by Hugo-Sébastien Aubert, Press Archive

Claude Le Bell, President and Founder of Solertia

“A strip of fabric, like a scarf, will fold in half when you want to wrap it. At Perepunka, we had to create waveforms that contradicted the natural movement of the membrane. To achieve this, we had to create a unique structure for each sun visor,” explains the former artistic director and editor-in-chief. At Cirque du Soleil.

The Sollertia team also had to face the challenge of attaching its sunshades to the glass facade where fixing points are limited. “Together with the architects and engineers, we invented new anchors capable of supporting the high wind loads at this location,” says Mr. Le Bell.

  • Areas of glass let in light, while the cathedral ceiling creates a balance with the ancient church next door.

    Photo by Stefan Grollo, courtesy of MDO

    Areas of glass let in light, while the cathedral ceiling creates a balance with the ancient church next door.

  • We can clearly see the large, contorted vertical sun masks.

    Photo by Stefan Grollo, courtesy of MDO

    We can clearly see the large, contorted vertical sun masks.

1/2

He confirms that the whole thing is just as resistant, if not more, than its steel or aluminum counterpart. In addition, it offers the advantage of being transparent, thus not completely blocking sunlight while reducing its heat.

The desired effect had been achieved, the architects rejoiced. “Sun screens give the impression of open pages, or even sails on a lake. In both cases, the symbolism is consistent with the nature of the building and its environment.”

read more

  • 1700 AD⁠2
    Pereponka area area

You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *