Alabama cookies that will absolutely melt in your mouth

Alabama cookies that will absolutely melt in your mouth

Waysider biscuits. You can’t even start your meal without it, and then your eyes light up when this dish floats out of the sky just a split second after the steam hits your nose.

The widely popular and world-famous Tuscaloosa breakfast has lived on Greensboro Street in one form or another for more than a century, and for good reason.

Delicious eggs prepared in every way, delicious ham, and a mountain of hotcakes – yes.

is reading: Get a little taste of Alabama football history at this popular restaurant

The Museum of Timeless Alabama Football Art that documents the immortality of the Crimson Tide and surrounds every customer until the last bite (because you eat them all) – absolutely.

But the biscuits. That’s why you keep coming back, and will keep coming back for the rest of your life with your children and your children’s children.

Elizabeth Snow Farr, who had purchased The Waysider from its original owner, was running the restaurant when Linda Smyly came to work here in 1976. Thirteen years later, she and her husband, Jerry Smyly, bought the restaurant and ran it together until he died in 1996.

They’ve since continued the tradition of the quaint red house with stories to tell, about Bama football and one of the best breakfasts you’ll ever eat thanks to a certain everyday Southern bread.

More of Alabama’s best dishes

what are they?

Known for its “breakfast of champions,” The Waysider offers made-from-scratch biscuits with every order. Thin, golden brown buttermilk that completely melts in your mouth, with or without the extra butter you may add. To be clear, a biscuit comes with every egg dish or order including a meat dish, but not with pancakes or French toast. Fear not, you can always get a side order of cookies if you want. so you.

Where can you get it?

Historic Waysider opened as a restaurant in the mid-1800s in 1951. Located on Greensboro Avenue just off 15th Street, the little red house that houses some of the best biscuits in the Southeast remains one of the city’s staple restaurant destinations thanks to its rich history. Southern hospitality, delicious brunch, and Alabama football-inspired decor. It belongs on every college football fan’s bucket list.

Who invented them?

“When I came to work here, Mrs. Farr owned the restaurant. She was the one who made the biscuits,” Elizabeth Smillie said.

Is the recipe secret?

It’s no big secret, Smylie said, that the world-famous Waysider biscuits follow a recipe similar to what you’ll see on the back of a bag of Tulip White flour. But if you don’t have the feeling, you won’t get the biscuits. “It’s basically the same thing, you just have to know how much,” she said. “We don’t have a recipe. We just pour it in there and grab a handful of Crisco and buttermilk and follow the texture. We don’t measure. So I can’t tell you the amount… I couldn’t do that.”

Notable clients?

The most famous in these parts, of course, is Paul “The Bear” Bryant. The legendary Crimson Tide coach even had his own place in the already tight space. Bob Carlton of AL.com wrote of Bryant’s table, “He usually sat alone at a small wooden table in the corner near the front door. … He usually ordered sugar bacon with bulgur, biscuits, and coffee, and he would read the newspaper while he ate. That The old table now serves as a shrine to Coach Bryant. A checkered hat rests on a bus bust that rests on the table, along with a vase of crimson and white flowers. Framed photographs and memories from his 25-year coaching career at Alabama cover the wall behind it.

Others include a wide range of sports figures, including coaches (the late Bobby Knight), athletes (former heavyweight boxing champion Deontay Wilder, “a lot of football players,” Smillie said), and politicians (U.S. senators Like Richard Shelby and Katie Britt), and “a lot of footballers,” Smillie said. And on-air personalities on ESPN like Todd Blackledge, who filmed a “Todd’s Taste of the Town” segment there, the network’s Marty Smith (“Everything about that place was unbelievable,” Smith said) and Ryan McGee (“Their country ham was Out of scope “charts.”)who even sang the restaurant’s praises on air.

They had movie stars coming in and out, Smylie said. She remembers actors from the 1970s like Brian Keith filming Burt Reynolds’ famous action movie “Hopper” in the city, as well as John Marley playing a Hollywood producer who wakes up with a horse’s head in his bed in “The Godfather.”

When did they become so popular?

Twelve years after opening the restaurant in 1948, Farr bought it in 1960 when Tuscaloosa had only a few breakfast options, so the restaurant and biscuits became a hit almost immediately. “We were downtown, right here near the center of things. Of course, we’re not considered downtown now, but back then we were,” Smylie said. “The go-cart ran across the street downtown. Many people eat here. Lots of business people. Not just blue collar, but white collar and everything.

What makes them special?

it is easy. “We make them from scratch,” Smylie said. “We don’t empty a bag or mix or pre-mix or anything like that. You know they’re homemade. You can taste the buttermilk in them. They’re fluffy. They’re biscuits.” She recalls that when she first started working at The Waysider in 1976, she wrote an article in the Dallas Morning News called “The Search for Better Biscuits” about the restaurant. “You don’t find them like us,” she said. “Most of them are pre-mixed, pre-measured or instant. And a lot of them taste like rolls to me.”

How many do they serve daily?

On an average day, they might serve about 200-300 cookies. On a busy day, like when Alabama plays football or just a regular Saturday, Smyly loses count. “We make multiple pans. I never count them, I just do them,” she said. “Each pan makes 48 cookies. This means about eight pans a day. And on the weekends, oh my goodness, it’s double. “People eat a lot of cookies.”

When Alabama played LSU in November, Smyly said she thought she would never stop making it. “One day, she used 40 pounds of flour. ‘That’s a lot of cookies,’ she said. When word got out that Tide quarterback Jalen Milroe and teammates like Tyrion Arnold and Caleb Downs had eaten at the restaurant during the week, fans started lining up. And you can guess what. What that means for the kitchen: “Everyone was outside waiting to get in here, so I was making cookies,” Smylie said.

“The Road in Tuscaloosa.” Located on Greensboro Avenue just off 15th Street, this little red house remains one of the city’s premier dining destinations thanks to its rich history, warm Southern hospitality, delicious breakfast and brunch fare, and Alabama football-inspired decor. (Ben Flanagan/AL.com)
“The Road in Tuscaloosa.” Located on Greensboro Avenue just off 15th Street, this little red house remains one of the city’s premier dining destinations thanks to its rich history, warm Southern hospitality, delicious breakfast and brunch fare, and Alabama football-inspired decor. (Ben Flanagan/AL.com)
The menu is at The Waysider in Tuscaloosa. Located on Greensboro Avenue just off 15th Street, this little red house remains one of the city’s premier dining destinations thanks to its rich history, warm Southern hospitality, delicious breakfast and brunch fare, and Alabama football-inspired decor. (Ben Flanagan/AL.com)
Fresh homemade biscuits at The Waysider in Tuscaloosa. Located on Greensboro Avenue just off 15th Street, this little red house remains one of the city’s premier dining destinations thanks to its rich history, warm Southern hospitality, delicious breakfast and brunch fare, and Alabama football-inspired decor. (Ben Flanagan/AL.com)

You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *